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Race, Prejudice and UNESCO: the liberal discourse of Cyril Bibby and Michael Banton.

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CONTRIBUTORS:
  Author McNeil, Daniel (b. ----, d. ----)
JOURNAL:
  History of Education Researcher , 85(2), ?? - ??.
YEAR: 2010
PUB TYPE: Journal Article
SUBJECT(S): None
DISCIPLINE: Cultural Studies
HTTP:
LANGUAGE: English
PUB ID: 103-482-837 (Last edited on 2010/09/27 05:06:21 GMT-6)
SPONSOR(S):
 
ABSTRACT:
This paper draws on the archives of Cyril Bibby in order to document how his self-fashioning as a progressive force in British sex education intersected with his work on Race, Prejudice and Education (1959), a text commissioned by UNESCO to combat racial discrimination. Since one of the reasons the US State Department sought to censor Bibby’s text was because it mentioned the distinguished work of African Americans with links to the Communist Party, the essay also endeavours to show how Bibby defined his personal vision of race and sex education as liberal crusades against conservatives and radicals. In addition, the paper addresses Bibby’s connection to Michael Banton, a leading scholar in the struggles to dismantle racialized thought and racial discrimination, and Banton’s discussions of conservative, radical and liberal approaches to the teaching of race. It contends that the liberal discourse of Bibby and Banton, much like Powellite anti-anti-racism after 1968, denied the biological reality of race by counter-asserting that races still existed as ‘natural’, socially defined ethnic groups.
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