getCITED   
  Home     Search     Add Content     Reports     Help  
Edit Publication | Edit Contributors | Delete Publication | Edit References | Edit Citations
Add to Bookstack | Show Bookstack | Change Bookstack

The "Wisconsin Labor Advocate" of La Crosse, the Knights of Labor, and George Edwin Taylor

Post a Comment
CONTRIBUTORS:
  Author Mouser, Bruce Lee (b. ----, d. ----)
JOURNAL:
  Past, Present, & Future: Newsletter of the La Crosse County Historical Society, 20(3), 1, 3 - 7.
YEAR: 1998
PUB TYPE: Journal Article
SUBJECT(S): 1904 Presidential Campaign; George Edwin Taylor; Wisconsin Labor Advocate; African-American newspaper and editor
DISCIPLINE: History
HTTP:
LANGUAGE: English
PUB ID: 103-393-173 (Last edited on 2003/08/06 22:49:15 GMT-6)
SPONSOR(S):
 
ABSTRACT:
This paper focuses on the life of George Edwin Taylor in La Crosse, Wisconsin. Taylor was raised by an African-American settler in La Crosse and attended boarding school at Wayland Academy in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. Taylor became owner and editor of the "Wisconsin Labor Advocate", a newspaper that was the mouthpiece of Frank Powell (aka White Beaver Powell, sidekick to Buffalo Bill Cody) who served as mayor of La Crosse for two terms during the 1880s. Powell won against both the Republican and Democratic parties and represented the Farmer and Workingmen's Party. Taylor's newspaper then became the voice of the Wisconsin Union Labor Party which ran strong in statewide elections in the mid-1880s. Taylor served as Secretary for the state party. Taylor was a state representative that attended the National Union Labor Party convention in Cincinnati in 1887, addressing that convention along with Henry George. Taylor left La Crosse late in the 1880s, operating African-American newspapers in Iowa. Between 1900 and 1904, Taylor was a member of the radical fringe within the National Democratic party, and tried to reform that party from within. Many African-Americans left the Democratic camp during the 1904 St. Louis Convention, however, and formed a new all African-American party that they called the National Liberty Party. From this base, Taylor accepted the nomination of that party as its candidate for the office of President of the United States in 1904. Taylor was the first candidate of a national African-American party for that office.
STATISTICS
Click on # to view
 Citations  
 References  
 Comments  
 Quality      0/0.00 
 Interest      0/0.00 
 View(er)s   3/891 
Quality
  N/A
High
  7
  6
  5
  4
  3
  2
  1
Low
Interest
  N/A
High
  7
  6
  5
  4
  3
  2
  1
Low
Prev | Next

    ABOUT getCITED   |    CONTACT US   |    USER INFO   |    PREFERENCES   |    PRIVACY   |    LOG IN   
Comments? Suggestions? Send them to feedback@getCITED.org.

Copyright © 2000-2013 getCITED Inc. All Rights Reserved.