getCITED   
  Home     Search     Add Content     Reports     Help  
Edit Publication | Edit Contributors | Delete Publication | Edit References | Edit Citations
Add to Bookstack | Show Bookstack | Change Bookstack

Race, job applicants, and the five-factor model of personality: implications for black psychology, industrial/organizational psychology, and the five-factor theory

Post a Comment
CONTRIBUTORS:
  Author Collins, Judith M.
  Author Gleaves, David H.
JOURNAL:
  Journal of Applied Psychology [JAP], 83(4), 531 - 44.
YEAR: 1998
PUB TYPE: Journal Article
SUBJECT(S): Personality-traits; Race-differences; Employees-Selection-and-appointment
DISCIPLINE: No discipline assigned
HTTP:
LANGUAGE: English
PUB ID: 103-361-483 (Last edited on 2002/02/27 18:44:49 US/Mountain)
SPONSOR(S):
 
ABSTRACT:
We tested the fit of the five-factor model of personality with a sample of African American (n = 184) and Caucasian (n = 168) job applicants using confirmatory factor analysis with tests of invariance across groups. Indicators for the analyses were responses to the 80 Bipolar Adjective Checklist. The results provided moderate support for the five-factor theory for both groups, and the addition of corresponding constraints on the factor loadings, factor correlations, and latent means did not lead to a significant loss in model fit. There were only differences on four elements of the error matrices. Thus, for the most part, the five-factor model fit equally well for African American and Caucasian applicants. However, for both groups, all factors were highly intercorrelated consistent with an "ideal responding" response set. Implications for Black psychology, I/O psychology, and the five-factor theory are discussed.
STATISTICS
Click on # to view
 Citations  
 References  
 Comments  
 Quality      0/0.00 
 Interest      0/0.00 
 View(er)s   2/4365 
Quality
  N/A
High
  7
  6
  5
  4
  3
  2
  1
Low
Interest
  N/A
High
  7
  6
  5
  4
  3
  2
  1
Low
Prev | Next

    ABOUT getCITED   |    CONTACT US   |    USER INFO   |    PREFERENCES   |    PRIVACY   |    LOG IN   
Comments? Suggestions? Send them to feedback@getCITED.org.

Copyright © 2000-2013 getCITED Inc. All Rights Reserved.