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Changes in electroencephalographic activity associated with learning a novel motor task

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CONTRIBUTORS:
  Author Etnier, J. L. (Arizona State University)
  Author Whitver, S. S.
  Author Landers, D. M. (Arizona State University)
  Author Petruzzello, S. J. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
  Author Salazar, W.
JOURNAL:
  Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES), 67(3), 272 - 279.
YEAR: 1996
PUB TYPE: Journal Article
SUBJECT(S): motor-skill; learning; electroencephalography; adaptation; man; woman; young-adult
DISCIPLINE: No discipline assigned
HTTP: https://secure.sportquest.com/su.cfm?articleno=404481&title=404481
LANGUAGE: English
PUB ID: 103-342-396 (Last edited on 2002/02/27 18:44:09 US/Mountain)
SPONSOR(S):
 
ABSTRACT:
This study was designed to examine changes in EEG activity associated with the learning of a novel task. Righ-handed adults (N=61) were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Subjects' EEG was recorded at 10 sites. Subjects' performance was assessed using 8-s trials on a mirror star trace. On the acquisition day, the experimental subjects performed 175 trials while the control subjects performed 10 trials, sat quietly for the amount of time needed to perform 155 trials, and then performed 10 more trials. On the retention day, all sujects performed 20 trials. There was a significant Group X Day X Trial interaction that showed that performance improved across trial blocks and across days; however, after the first 10 acquisition trials, the experimental subjects were always significantly better than the control subjects. Analysis of the EEG data showed a significant four-way interaction that showed that following the first 10 acquisition trials, the experimental subjects had more alpha activity than the control subjects. It is concluded that there are consistent EEG changes in the alpha band that are associated with learning a motor task.
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